Windows switching to differential patching in the Creators Update

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Major Windows 10 updates, including this summer's Anniversary Update and next year's Creators Update, are distributed as essentially full operating system installs. The downloads are around 4GB, and installing them performs a complete in-place upgrade to Windows.

That is set to change as Microsoft rolls out what it calls its Unified Update Platform (UUP). Major upgrades will be shipped as differential updates, where only the differences between the currently installed version and the newly installed version need to be downloaded. The company estimates that this will result in major version upgrades being around 35 percent smaller.

UUP should also make checking for updates faster, as more of the computational workload to figure out the patches that a system needs will be handled in the cloud rather than on the client.

In making this change, some differences between the Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 PC update process are being eliminated. Currently the desktop platform can generally upgrade from any patch level to the latest version in one shot; on mobile, sometimes multiple updates are required, with two separate download, install, and reboot processes.

End-users on stable builds of Windows won't see this change take effect until after the Creators Update; the client-side infrastructure necessary to support these differential updates will be a part of that release. Insiders, however, who regularly perform major version updates (as every new Insider build is installed as an in-place upgrade) will begin seeing the improvements much sooner. Mobile releases will enable UUP updating starting with today's build 14959, with the technology coming to PC builds a little later in the year, followed by Windows IoT and Windows for HoloLens. Excluded from this is Xbox, which will retain its own update process.

Windows 10's Anniversary Update is now available

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Anniversary Update is here and ready to download. The software maker first started testing its Anniversary Update back in December, and now all Windows 10 users get to experience the new features and improvements free of charge. Chief among them is a new Windows Ink feature. Microsoft has supported inking in Windows for years, but Windows Ink is a dedicated hub designed for devices like the Surface Pro 4, and other 2-in-1s with styluses. Windows Ink will work with your fingers, for doodling and inking on screenshots, but it will obviously work better with a dedicated stylus.

Windows 10 Anniversary Update also includes a number of UI improvements to the Start menu, notification center, taskbar, and overall dark theme. Microsoft is also tweaking Cortana to allow the digital assistant to work on the lock screen and answer queries. If you're a fan of Microsoft's Edge browser, it's also getting extension support today. Extensions like LastPass, 1Password, AdBlock, and EverNote are all available, and more should arrive in the Windows Store in the coming months. Windows 10 Anniversary Update is available from Windows Update immediately, an ISOs are also available (or an easy clean install tool) if you're interested in clean installing the update to your system.

Visual Studio updates Xamarin

When you open Visual Studio 2015 and there is a pop windows to invite you to click on it for updating Xamarin and you click, nothing happends. There is a bug but clicking the update available popup was fixed in one of the recent releases. You can manually update in the Options menu under Tools.

As for the errors, I get those all the time. Support packages can often be a problem. Update to the latest XF package. Try deleting bin, obj, and the contents of packages folders and rebuild.

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Microsoft says Windows 10 Anniversary Update is coming August 2nd

microsoft-build-2016Windows 10's first big update will arrive August 2nd — or, at least, that's what it sounds like. Microsoft published a blog post earlier today that included only a headline, "Microsoft announces Windows 10 Anniversary Update available Aug. 2," and then pulled the story moments later. It's possible that Microsoft just got the date wrong, but, more likely than not, Microsoft seems to have just clicked the publish button earlier than it meant to. Presumably, a formal announcement will come soon.

Microsoft announced Windows 10's Anniversary Update back in March, during its Build conference. The update puts a major focus on Windows Ink, building out its feature set to make stylus use far more powerful. It also brings extensions to Edge, as well as smaller improvements to Hello and Cortana, along with some minor interface tweaks.

Windows 10 Anniversary Update Targeted For Late July Release

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It may seem obvious but Microsoft is planning to release the Anniversary update for Windows 10 in late July. While the company has not explicitly said when it will be released, insiders at the company have acknowledged that the current road map is for the update to be finalized in mid-July.

As with all timelines, the release date could change, especially since we are a few months out and road maps are used for guidance and are not always hard dates. Considering that Windows 10 was released on July 29th, it would make sense that the company would release the Anniversary update on or around that date; the 29th is a Friday.

The last couple of Windows 10 builds have been packed with new features that should make most end-users happy. Everything from a new dark theme, although it’s far from perfect, to new Cortana features, enhancements to the Action Center, an updated Start menu and a lot more are coming in this release.

At this time, Microsoft still has a few more tricks up its sleeve, although they are small features, that will be coming with the update when it arrives. But, as we get closer to the release date, expect new feature introduction to slow down and a focus on bug bashing to spin up.

Earlier this week, Microsoft released a new build of Windows 10, 14332, that you can view here.

Microsoft adds 'non-security updates' to security patches

MS16-023, billed as a “Security update for Internet Explorer” and issued on March 8, includes six “General distribution release (GDR) fixes”.

Five are innocuous as they address glitches like “Empty textarea loses its closing tag in Internet Explorer 11 after conversion from XML to HTML.”

But the last item on the list item 3146449, has the rather more interesting title “Updated Internet Explorer 11 capabilities to upgrade Windows 8.1 and Windows 7.”

A great many users just accept all Windows updates, so will never see item 3146449. Even if you are diligent enough to visit the page for MS16-023 you'll probably miss it, because it's far enough down the page that scrolling is required to see it.

Only once you visit 3146449's knowledge base page you'll find the following explanation for the patch:

This update adds functionality to Internet Explorer 11 on some computers that lets users learn about Windows 10 or start an upgrade to Windows 10.

We've no idea what that means, so have asked Microsoft what that sentence means in an effort to understand the sentence and the purpose of item 3146449.

Some users report that the update adds ads to older versions of Windows. Those ads include a button to initiate a Windows 10 upgrade.

Windows 10 is growing nicely, gaining one per cent of global market share in February alone. Microsoft's made no secret of its ambitions to quickly kill off Windows 8.x and its predecessors.

What’s New in Visual Studio Update 1 for .NET Managed Languages

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Hold on to your hats, cowboys and cowgirls! A lot of exciting things are coming out of the .NET Managed Languages team for Visual Studio 2015 Update 1. Read on to learn more about new IDE features, interactive C#, new code analysis management, Visual F# improvements, and the new F5 experience for Roslyn open source development.

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New Editor Features

Now that we have Roslyn in Visual Studio 2015, we can leverage its power to create the smartest IDE out there. The improvements we’ve made to the IDE experience in Update 1 relate chiefly to navigation and refactoring:

  • Go To Implementation. The most notable change we made with regards to navigation is the introduction of “Go To Implementation.” You can now navigate from a base class or type to its various implementations. This saves a lot of time when searching in large solutions—when using Find All References returns a long list.
  • Convert Method to Property. We added the refactoring that now allows you to press “Ctrl+.” inside a method with no arguments and convert it into a property. We’ll even notice if you have a pair of Get/Set methods and convert them into a single property. This refactoring cascades throughout your solution so you don’t have to manually fix this change elsewhere.
  • VB Go to Definition and Object Browser. After hearing feedback from many of you, we added an option to make it easy to restore the behavior where VB Go to Definition would navigate to the Object Browser. You can find this option under "Tools->Options->Text Editor->Basic->Advanced->Navigate to Object Browser for symbols defined in metadata".
  • VB Commands for Next/Previous Member Fix. Many VB customers noticed that we forgot to implement support for navigate to the next and previous method. Oops. We brought that back, and added support for C# as well. Look for it on the Edit menu.
  • Go To/Peek Definition Bug Fix. We fixed this issue where you had to change your tabs to spaces in order to Peek Definition or Go To Definition. Huzzah! (Could you tell that Roslyn’s coding style is to use spaces instead of tabs? ;))

Visual Studio 2015: upgrade all NuGet packages at one time

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Open the Package Manager Console and use the Update-Package cmd-let to update all packages.

If this doesn't work, you have other two solution. Always in Package Manager Console you type one of those:

First solution
  1. $list = Get-package -project {Add project name here} for($i=0; $i -lt $list.Length;$i ++ ) { Update-Package -project {Add project name here} $list[$i].Id }

Replace {Add project name here} with your project name without braket

Second solution
  1. foreach ($p in get-project -all) { update-package -ProjectName $p.ProjectName }

 

Happy coding!

Microsoft pushes out a big update for Windows 10

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There haven’t been many updates for Windows 10 since Microsoft launched its new operating system last week, but today the software giant is rolling out a cumulative update designed to "enhance the functionality of Windows 10 through new features and improvements".

If you’ve been experiencing problems with the new OS, as I have, then this update may go some way to overcoming them.

The cumulative update, KB 3081424, contains all of the previously released fixes (see KB 3074683), as well as some new ones. There are no security-related changes.

The full list of updates can be viewed here, and it’s extensive, if rather unexciting. Although there has been talk of this being Windows 10 Service Release 1 (SR1), Microsoft's Gabriel Aul says it doesn't has a name, as far as he knows, and is "just a cumulative servicing update".

You can update your Windows 10 installation now by going to Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update. Even though it's a ~325MB update it should download and install very speedily, and you will need to restart your PC afterwards to action the changes.

Windows 10 uses peer-to-peer networking to distribute updates by default

WUDO

Now that Windows is a service (WaaS), which means it will constantly be updated rather than have big regular updates, Microsoft has put some features in to Windrows 10 to speed up the delivery of those updates. One feature that may have escaped your notice is called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). This feature isn't mentioned in the "Get Started" app but needs to be searched for in the documentation.

This new Windows 10 feature works in a similar way to torrent technology which uses a peer to peer network to distribute files quickly over the internet. The torrent system works so effectively because as files are downloaded, parts of the file are also uploaded to the next computer and so on. In order to receive, you have to give a little back.

Windows 10 works in a similar way with the WUDO feature. If your computer has downloaded an update but a computer on your local network hasn't, then your computer will send that data to the other computer. It's faster than updating over the internet. To change how Windows distributes downloads, do the following:

Go to Settings > Update & security > Under Windows Update, hit Advanced options > Choose how updates are delivered

Then choose to get updates from only PCs on your local network, or PCs on your local network, and PCs on the Internet

Also, by default, the WUDO is set to send updates to computers over the internet (similar to torrents). Happily, Microsoft assures that no personal information is sent in the transfer and no changes are made to any files on the PC. The feature will also only use limited and unused bandwidth and if your connection is set to metered, then it won't do it at all. However, if you have a capped Wi‑Fi connection, you should make sure Windows 10 sees it as a metered connection by doing the following:

Go to Start  [Start button icon] , then Settings > Network & Internet > Wi‑Fi > Advanced options.

Use the toggle under Set as metered connection to set your Wi‑Fi connection as metered.

While this feature will help get Windows update faster and that's a good thing, Microsoft needs to be wary about eroding any positive feeling Windows 10 has built up. To do that, it should at least highlight this option during the update process.

Advertsing

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