Happy 15th Birthday .NET!

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Today marks the 15th anniversary since .NET debuted to the world. On February 13th, 2002, the first version of .NET was released as part of Visual Studio.NET. It seems just like yesterday when Microsoft was building its “Next Generation Windows Services” and unleashed a new level of productivity with Visual Studio.NET.

Since the beginning, the .NET platform has allowed developers to quickly build and deploy robust applications, starting with Windows desktop and web server applications in 2002. You got an entire managed framework for building distributed Windows applications, ASP.NET was introduced as the next generation Active Server Pages for web-based development, and a new language, C# (pronounced “see sharp” :-)) came to be.

Over the years, .NET and it’s ecosystem has grown and expanded to meet the needs of all kinds of developers and platforms. As the technology landscape has changed, so has .NET. You can build anything with .NET including cross-platform web apps, cloud services, mobile device apps, games and so much more. We have a vibrant open-source community where you can participate in the direction of .NET.

It’s a Good Day to Be a C# Developer

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Recently at Connect(), Microsoft made a slew of new announcements. First, the public availability of Visual Studio 2017 Release Candidate. This just isn't a new version of the signature developer tool, it also includes the latest bits for C# 7.0. Second, Google announced they were joining the .NET Foundation. This means that Google, technically a competitor of Microsoft, wants to be actively involved in the evolution of .NET (and indirectly C#). Third, the first public release of Visual Studio for Mac. As a native environment, Visual Studio for Mac will provide the same world class tooling support for Xamarin applications, using C# and F#.

We could go on, but there is a common thread that runs between many of these announcements. As a developer, choosing C# as a part of your technology stack is an excellent decision! But what if you are not a C# developer already? How does C# compare to other popular languages such as JavaScript, Java, Python, etc?

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