The Windows 3.0 File Manager is now available in the Microsoft Store

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Microsoft open sourced the original File Manager that shipped with Windows 3.0, allowing users to make changes and if they want, compile it for use on Windows 10. Now, the firm is making it easier to run the legacy app, as it's offering the Windows 3.0 File Manager through the Microsoft Store (via Aggiornamenti Lumia) as a UWP app.

The app is listed as being available on PC, mobile, Surface Hub, and HoloLens; however, it also requires the device to be installed on Windows 10 build 16299 or newer. Obviously, there are no mobile devices that qualify. If you do have a Windows phone that you want to try it out on, you could always download the code and try to compile it for an earlier build.

Obviously, there were some modifications that had to be made to the original app to get it to run on Windows 10. After all, Windows 3.0 was a 16-bit operating system. Microsoft also had to add header files that were previously stored in the NT source tree, and it had to make some APIs public.

This isn't the first time that Microsoft has dabbled in software nostalgia. As an April Fool's joke in 2015, it released an MS-DOS Mobile app for Windows phones. If you want to download the Windows File Manager app, you can find it here.

Latest Windows 10 build puts desktop apps in a 3D world

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Microsoft has released a new Insider preview build of Windows 10. Build 18329 should be available now to most people who have opted into the fast preview ring. Though it's not available to everyone because, for some reason, the new build isn't available in all the languages it'd normally be shipped in.

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The strangest new feature is that you can now launch and run regular Win32 apps—2D apps built for the desktop—in the Windows Mixed Reality environment that's used for both virtual reality headsets and the HoloLens augmented reality headset. Previously, it was only possible to run apps built using the modern UWP API. Now, it seems that any Windows application will work. If you want to use Photoshop or Visual Studio with a headset on, you can.The new build also adds a couple of new scripts to support the writing of languages that until recently had no adequate written form. There's the Osage language spoken by the Osage Nation in Oklahoma (which prior to 2006 used the Latin alphabet with various diacritics) and the ADLaM script used to write Pular, the language of the Fulani people in West Africa (which, similarly, used the Roman alphabet with diacritics prior to the development of the new alphabet in the 1980s). ADLaM and Osage were both added to Unicode in 2016.

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